New HIV vaccine, gonorrhea may soon be untreatable, more school equals better heart

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Too much red meat might harm kidneys. Red meat intake, in this case, mostly pork was strongly associated with an increased risk of end-stage renal disease, the loss of normal kidney function. The relationship was also “dose dependent”—meaning the higher the consumption, the greater the risk.

Gonorrhea may soon become resistant to all antibiotics and untreatable. The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that the bacterial disease is developing a resistance to the drugs that are being used to cure it.

The CDC has found that there is an increasing number gonorrhea cases that have become resistant to the two drugs which are used in combination to treat the STD, azithromycin, and ceftriaxone.

A study says couples that get wasted together stay together. A study published in the Journals of Gerontology B: Psychology Sciences found that for couples over the age of 50, marriages were better off when both partners drank or both abstained. If one-half was boozing hard while the other sat by, stone-cold sober, couples were more likely to experience marital problems, particularly if the one doing the drinking was the wife. Women who drank while their husbands didn’t were often dissatisfied with their marriages.

Healthy eating can include ‘a lot’ of (good) fat. An analysis of 56 previously conducted diet studies have concluded that the idea of eating healthy fats may fill you up more than carbohydrates, and the misplaced emphasis over the past 30 years on eating a low-fat diet may have backfired by leading people to eat unchecked amounts of sugar and refined carbohydrates leading to obesity.

New HIV vaccine to be trialed in South Africa. Experts have long been awaiting a vaccine showing enough efficacy to dent the numbers of people newly infected with HIV each year. Now a vaccine will be trialed in 5,400 people across four sites in South Africa later this year, after meeting the criteria needed to prove it could help fight the epidemic in Africa.

Here’s what cholesterol can do to the brain. There’s growing evidence that the heart and brain are connected since both rely on keeping the blood system healthy. Now a study finds a connection between changes in LDL, or bad, cholesterol and reduced cognitive functions.

Do you get enough vitamin D with sunscreen on? Louis Levy, head of nutrition science at Public Health England, says if you apply sunscreen in the way the manufacturers recommend then you won’t produce any vitamin D from sunshine.

7 Types of plastic wreaking havoc on our health. One of the main chemicals used to produce plastics is bisphenol A, or BPA, an endocrine disruptor, it is prevalent in a vast number of widely used products.

The health risks of BPA have been observed as reproductive cancers, obesity, type-2 diabetes and even autism. These have been extrapolated from animal testing, however, they are noted to be increasing in the human population in the past 50 years, mirroring the rise of plastic consumption.

Same genes could make us prone to both happiness and depression. Researchers suggest that while no gene ’causes’ mental ill health, some genes can make people more sensitive to the effects of their environment — for better and for worse — leading to both mental ill health and enhanced mental resilience.

Surprising discovery:

A study suggests more school is better for your heart. While there are many obvious benefits to achieving a higher level of education, one you may not have considered is a boost to your heart health. New research suggests that heart attack survivors with higher levels of education appear less likely to develop heart failure.

The researchers focused on patients who underwent procedures to clear blocked arteries after their heart attack, the risk of heart failure was 16 percent lower among those with high school or vocational school diplomas, and 33 percent lower among those who’d completed college or university, compared to those with only 10 years of schooling.

The link between higher levels of education and lower risk of heart failure was similar in men and women, the study found. [Health.com]

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