Millennials are having less sex, overweight ages brains, McDonald’s axes preservatives from menu items

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Kids may outgrow ADHD. For parents of children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study delivers some uplifting news: Kids may outgrow it by their 18th birthday.

Being overweight ‘ages people’s brains’. Brains naturally lose white matter – the part of the brain that transmits information – as people age. But a Cambridge University team found that loss was exacerbated by extra weight – so an overweight 50-year-old had a lean 60-year-old’s brain. Researchers said it shows we need to know relatively more about how extra weight affects the brain.

Vitamin D levels may drop when women stop using birth control. Women risk having their vitamin D levels fall when they stop using birth control pills or other contraceptives containing estrogen, according to a new study.

“Our study found that women who were using contraception containing estrogen tended to have higher vitamin D levels than other women,” said the study’s first author, Quaker E. Harmon, MD, PhD. “We could not find any behavioral differences such as increased time spent outdoors to explain the increase. Our findings suggest that contraceptives containing estrogen tend to boost vitamin D levels, and those levels are likely to fall when women cease using contraception.”

Why millennials are having less sex than Generation Xers. “There’s the possibility that technology has something to do with this,” said Jean Twenge, lead researcher of the new study. If you’re spending more time texting with your friends and less time in person, she explained, you might have fewer opportunities to “hook up.” Or, more simply, since “there are more ways to entertain yourself,” sex is less important, being just one of many possibilities on a growing list.

Pregnancy Problems More Likely With Baby Boys, Study Suggests. After analyzing more than half a million births in Australia, researchers said the baby’s gender could be linked to the health of both mother and child.

Boy babies were more likely to be born early, which sets up infants for more health problems. Also, women carrying boys were slightly more likely to have diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes), and pre-eclampsia, a serious high blood pressure condition, when ready to deliver, the study authors said.

McDonald’s axing high-fructose corn syrup, preservatives from menu items. The changes come as the world’s biggest burger chain fights to win back customers after three straight years of declining guest counts at its established U.S. locations. Major restaurant chains are scrambling to step up the image of their food as they face more competition from smaller rivals promising more wholesome alternatives.

Pentagon says 33 U.S. military personnel infected with Zika. Thirty-three members of the U.S. military, including a pregnant woman, are believed to have contracted the mosquito-borne Zika virus overseas, the Pentagon said.

Air Force Major Ben Sakrisson, a Pentagon spokesman, said the U.S. service members are believed to have been infected outside the continental United States, but cautioned that it is hard to tell where exactly they may have contracted Zika.

Surprising discovery:

How a massive lobster was rescued from its fate at a South Florida restaurant. I’m just guessing here, but this probably isn’t what restaurant owner Joe Melluso was expecting, when he procured this really, really big lobster.

To be honest, it’s probably not what the lobster was expecting, either. The lobster which was destined to become the dinner of some restaurant patron in South Florida was saved from that fate.

The crustacean has now been given a name, Larry. And, according to reports, Larry the lobster is headed to a new destination, too — the Maine State Aquarium. [Washington Post]

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