Meditation to Relieve Stress and Anxiety

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Meditation

Stress is a natural part of our everyday life, and our bodies are well-equipped to deal with most stressful conditions that life throws our way.

For a lot of us, stress comes and goes, or at least that’s the way it should be.

All Stressed Out

Imagine this scenario. You’re out in the neighborhood walking the family dog when suddenly a large German Shepard appears out of nowhere.

Your dog doesn’t react well, and for a moment it seems as though both dogs will have a vicious battle, until the dog’s owner runs out of his house and corrals his Shepard, taking away the threat.

The incident leaves you shaking, but grateful about the outcome. In the meantime, your body is slowly coming down from being on a heightened state of alert.

The adrenaline that increased your heart rate is slowly dissipating and the level of cortisol that was released into your bloodstream is diminishing.

By the time you arrive home, things are back to normal again.

Chronic Stress

What if your stress level never went down?

What if you remained under constant threat all the time?

The effects on your body would be disastrous. Just look at the list below to see what kind of havoc constant stress can bring.

  • Weight Gain
  • Anxiety
  • Aches and Pains
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Insomnia
  • Chest Pain
  • Headaches

And that’s the short list!

Meditation to Relieve Stress

There are many tried and true methods to relieve stress, and everyone is different, so what works for one may not work for someone else.

I’ve had great success with using meditation to relieve stress, and there are so many other benefits associated with meditating on a daily basis that I believe almost everyone can benefit from it.

Meditation has been used around the world for thousands of years. Originally it was a way to gain a deeper understanding of life and spiritual forces, but eventually, people began to realize that meditation has many benefits beyond mystical understanding.

Get Started With Meditation

It couldn’t be easier to get started with meditation. No special equipment is required and only a few minutes is required at first

Pick a Perfect Time

At first, you’ll only need about 10 minutes of time to ease into the routine of daily meditation. You should pick a time when you know you’ll have the best chance of getting 10 uninterrupted minutes to yourself.

My perfect time is in the morning, while the house is still quiet and I can concentrate, but yours may be after work or right before bedtime.

Experiment and find whatever works for you.

Find a Quiet Place

This is another important aspect that can’t be overlooked. Find a place that’s quiet and free from distractions such as TV noise, cell phone text chatter, or traffic from a busy street outside.

Your meditation spot should be a place where you feel comfortable and that brings you peace. Make sure the temperature is not too hot or cold, and that you can relax and concentrate here.

After you gain more experience with meditation, you will probably be able to meditate almost anywhere, but for now, you’ll get the best results if you follow these tips.

Get Comfortable

Finding a comfortable position should be easy for you. Most people find that sitting with their hands in their lap with their shoulders relaxed is the best position for beginning meditation.

Meditation doesn’t have to be done in the Lotus position, as it is often depicted. Simply get seated comfortably, close your eyes, and relax.

I like to gently stretch before beginning meditation. It gets the blood flowing and loosens up my muscles.

Breathe Deeply

When just beginning with meditation, I believe the easiest way to get in a rhythm and achieve the best results is to focus on your breathing.

Concentrate on your breath as you inhale and exhale, feeling your stomach and chest expand and contract.

Inhale slowly through your nose and exhale through your mouth. Listen to the sound of your breath entering and leaving your body and focus your attention on it.

Feel the rhythm of your breathing and allow it to take you into a meditative state.

Forgive Yourself

During meditation, you may find that your mind wanders and you begin making a mental shopping list or wondering if you should be checking email.

This is natural and normal. Don’t let be upset with yourself.

Instead, gently push your mind back to where your focus is supposed to be. Concentrate on your breathing and only your breathing, and if your mind wanders off again, simply guide it back to where it’s supposed to be.

Ending Meditation

When your session is over, try to come out of your meditation slowly. Don’t be in a hurry to pop open your eyes or move from your meditation position.

Slowly returning to a non-meditative state will allow your body to shift gears and your mind to adjust to the fact that mediation is over.

Do your best to not abruptly end meditation. For every minute of deep meditation, allow yourself a minute or so to come out.

Meditation Is For Everyone

No matter where you are in life, meditation can be a beneficial for achieving calmness, serenity, focus, and peace of mind.

There are also a number of physical benefits, such as reduced blood pressure, lowering stress levels, and boosting your immune system.

Remember that you can get started with just a few minutes each day and still get wonderful results.

So what are you waiting for?

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Ted Begnoche is a writer and avid researcher on the subjects of nutrition and holistic wellness. He has recently published books on Sugar Detox as well as the inflammation epidemic, and continues to improve his knowledge by constantly remaining up to date with the latest news and trends in the nutrition world. When not busy writing, you can find him playing the banjo or guitar, outside fishing, or working on his blog, Holistic Health Path

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