Unlikely drug to block breast cancer, KFC boxes that double as phone chargers, and more

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Doing this at bedtime could temporarily harm your vision. A short-lived optical sensation can lead some smartphone users to mistakenly believe they’ve lost sight in one eye, British doctors report. The temporary vision loss can affect people who read their smartphone in the dark while lying on their side. When they stop reading and get up to do something else, they might suddenly lose vision in the eye they’ve been using to read their smartphone.

Ginger and acupressure ‘options for morning sickness’. Nausea and vomiting affects about 80% of pregnant women and these therapies could offer alternatives to women who want to avoid medication.

CDC panel recommends against using FluMist vaccine. The nasal spray version of the annual flu vaccine failed to protect kids again last year, the latest in a string of failures that has prompted an expert panel to recommend that doctors stop giving it to patients.

Impulsive children raised in caring families drink less during adolescence. Years of research have shown that impulsivity in childhood is among the individual vulnerabilities leading to substance abuse, delinquency, as well as aggressive and antisocial behavior in adolescence and adulthood. However, a new study shows that impulsive children who were raised in less coercive families at the age of 6 actually drank less alcohol than their less impulsive peers at the age of 15.

New York City Could See Thousands of Heat Deaths by 2080. As many as 3,331 people annually could die from heat waves by 2080 in New York City alone if no steps are taken to adapt to warming temperatures and reduce emissions, a new study warns.

Unlikely drug may block breast cancer in high-risk women. Scientists might have just pinpointed a nonsurgical way for women at a high risk of breast cancer to minimize their chances of developing the devastating disease.

Drugs already on the market to treat osteoporosis could be an option in the fight against breast cancer. Research also shows that the drug, denosumab, can stop certain breast tissue cells with the mutation from morphing into cancerous tumors.

In India, KFC is serving fried chicken in boxes that double as phone chargers. KFC is gifting Indians boxes of burgers and fried chicken with in-built mobile phone chargers.

The fast-food chain has launched limited-edition “Watt-A-Box” packages in Delhi and Mumbai to apparently add “an element of utility” to the otherwise humble paper boxes. Most of these boxes are up for grabs through an online contest, although some are being gifted to customers at select stores.

Doctors issue warning about LED streetlights. The American Medical Association (AMA) has just adopted an official policy statement about street lighting: cool it and dim it.

Municipalities are replacing existing streetlights with efficient and long-lasting LEDs to save money on energy and maintenance. Although the streetlights are delivering these benefits, the AMA’s stance reflects how important proper design of new technologies is and the close connection between light and human health.

List of possible Zika birth defects grows longer. The full scope of Zika-related birth defects may extend far beyond abnormally small heads and brain damage. Research suggests that serious joint problems, seizures, vision impairment, trouble feeding and persistent crying can be added to the list of risks from Zika exposure in the womb.

Dengue virus exposure may amplify Zika infection. Previous exposure to the dengue virus may increase the potency of Zika infection, according to research from Imperial College London. This may be why the current outbreak has been so severe, and why it has been in areas where dengue is prevalent.

Surprising discovery:

Stressful city life causes some birds to age faster. Researchers from Lund University in Sweden have shown that birds of the species Parus major, commonly known as the nesting great tit, are at an increased risk of dying young when they’re reared in an urban environment.

Although there are advantages to living in cities, such as the access to food, they seem to be outweighed by the disadvantages, such as stress—at least in terms of how quickly the cells of the great tits age, said Biologist Pablo Salmón in a press statement. By stress, he’s referring to such things as noise and light pollution, and close proximity to humans (not to mention cats). [Gizmodo]

#QuoteoftheWeek – “By cleansing your body on a regular basis and eliminating as many toxins as possible from your environment, your body can begin to heal itself, prevent disease, and become stronger and more resilient than you ever dreamed possible!”  ~Dr. Edward Group III

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